Showing posts with label Atlantic. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Atlantic. Show all posts

Friday, November 06, 2015

Nicaragua gives green light to canal project

Nicaragua on Thursday announced approval of an environmental and social impact study on a new canal that will link the Pacific with the Atlantic, allowing the project to go ahead.

Monday, September 14, 2015

Southern Ocean absorbing more CO2 than thought

The Southern Ocean has recovered its ability to suck vast amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, overturning fears the natural"sink"had stalled with dire consequences for future climate change.

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

UK braced for 'weather bomb'

 The UK is preparing to be hit by a "weather bomb" with freezing winds of up to 130 kilometers an hour and giant waves causing disruption to travel and power supplies.

The Met Office issued alerts on Wednesday as the deep, low-pressure system headed for the country.

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Mediterranean, North Atlantic prepares for UN-backed tsunami warning system test -- (Simulations will be carried out between 28 and 30 October)

UN, 23 October 2014 – Some 20 nations with coastlines on the North Atlantic, and Mediterranean and Black Seas are set to participate in a United Nations-supervised tsunami warning exercise to improve their ability to respond to an alert and enhance regional coordination in the event of a disaster.

In a press statement released today, the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) – the body coordinating the warning test since its first implementation in 2005 – reported that four tsunami simulations will be carried out between 28 and 30 October in an effort to assess the overall reactivity of countries participating in the Tsunami Early Warning and Mitigation System for the North-eastern Atlantic, the Mediterranean and connected seas (NEAMTWS).

Thursday, August 14, 2014

Panama Canal Turns 100 Amid Growing Pains, Competition

The Panama Canal turns 100 this week. Officially opened in 1914, the 77-kilometer channel joins the Atlantic and Pacific Ocean at the isthmus of Panama.  It made the world smaller, creating a shortcut for cargo ships that ply their trade from east and west.  But 100 years later the canal is straining from the demands of expanding global trade.  It may also be facing some serious competition as it navigates the next 100 years.
Taking over 30 years to build, tens of thousands of workers - and more than 27 million kilograms of dynamite - it is considered one of the biggest engineering feats of the 20th century.  

Thursday, July 03, 2014

Storm "Arthur" to turn into hurricane by Thursday (Hatteras Island in North Carolina evacuation)

US authorities announced the evacuation of residents of Hatteras Island in North Carolina because of the approaching tropical storm "Arthur." This was announced today that the regional emergency service. Start of the evacuation of residents and visitors of the island is scheduled for 5:00 Thursday local time (13:00 MSK). Gusts of wind, rough seas and flooding of the highway connecting the island to the mainland are expected in the region.

"All residents and visitors of the island are advised to leave it as soon as possible during the day," it says in the message.

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

21.000 oiseaux morts : une hécatombe historique sur le littoral Atlantique

VIDÉO - Épuisés et dénutris après les tempêtes de début d'année, des dizaines de milliers d'oiseaux marins sont venus s'échouer sur les plages de l'Atlantique. Un appel aux bénévoles a été lancé pour recenser les cadavres et sauver les bêtes toujours en vie.

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

Una especie invasora destruye hasta el 95% de la biodiversidad en el Atlántico

Los peces leones en menos de 35 años invadieron el área oeste del Atlántico, superior al territorio de EEUU, suplantando a otros predadores y destruyendo hasta el 95% de las especies, informó la Universidad de Oregon.

Friday, April 05, 2013

Marvelous Amazon River....The Pororoca Phenomenon (2VIDEO)

Watch Video CCTV

The Amazon river's volume of water runoff makes up 20 percent of the world’s total. Let’s take a look now at the source of this imposing rivers and its impressive natural beauty.
The Amazon River originates in the Andes Mountain in south Peru. It travels 6-thousand-nine-hundred-and-ninety-two-point-six kilometers before feeding into the Atlantic Ocean. It passes through Ecuador, Columbia and Venezuela on its way to the sea. The Amazon’s river basin covers an area of more than seven million square kilometers. Its water yield is one ninth of the world’s total fresh water.
About 6600 billion square kilometers of water runs into the Atlantic. It is called ’the king of rivers’. The longest stretch of the Amazon is to be found in Brazil, and the people there are very proud of it. A clear boundary is formed at the place where the Amazon river meets the Rio Negro River. This boundary is about seven kilometers long.

EL News